Research Methods In Politics Peter Burnham [Management books]

By: Burnham Peter ...et al.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Palgrave Macmillan 2004ISBN: 9780230019850.DDC classification: 320.072
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The second edition of this popular text provides a comprehensive introduction to the main research methods employed in the study of politics and assessment of their strengths and limitations and of ethical issues in research. It has been revised and updated throughout, and a new chapter considers the relationship between research and policy.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • List of Figures, Tables and Boxes (p. viii)
  • Preface (p. xi)
  • List of Abbreviations (p. xii)
  • Introduction: Methods, Methodology and Making Sense of the Study of Politics (p. 1)
  • Guiding themes (p. 2)
  • Structure of the book (p. 5)
  • 1 The Discipline of Politics (p. 9)
  • The diverse traditions of political science (p. 9)
  • Dominant paradigms (p. 19)
  • Political studies or political science: some methodological considerations (p. 30)
  • 2 Research Design and the Research Process (p. 38)
  • The meaning of research design (p. 39)
  • The research process (p. 45)
  • The research labyrinth (p. 53)
  • Types of research design (p. 55)
  • Conclusion (p. 68)
  • 3 Comparative Methods (p. 69)
  • Comparative political science: substance and method (p. 70)
  • Designing comparative research (p. 73)
  • Why compare? The advantages (p. 80)
  • The limits of comparison (p. 83)
  • Cases: how many, and which? (p. 87)
  • Conclusion (p. 94)
  • 4 Surveys, Polls and Focus Groups (p. 96)
  • Surveys, opinion polls and politics (p. 97)
  • History of opinion polls and surveys (p. 99)
  • Sampling procedures (p. 102)
  • Types of sample design (p. 103)
  • Administering surveys (p. 108)
  • Interviewing (p. 123)
  • Coding and analysis (p. 125)
  • Focus groups (p. 128)
  • Conclusion (p. 136)
  • 5 Descriptive Statistics (p. 138)
  • Levels of measurement, central tendency and spread (p. 140)
  • Choosing descriptive statistics (p. 151)
  • Presenting descriptive statistics (p. 153)
  • All that glitters ... (p. 166)
  • Conclusion (p. 169)
  • 6 Making Inferences (p. 171)
  • What is inference? (p. 172)
  • Inference - logic and problems (p. 177)
  • Inferences in political science (p. 179)
  • Conclusion (p. 186)
  • 7 Documentary and Archival Analysis (p. 187)
  • Use and abuse of secondary and tertiary documentary sources in political science (p. 190)
  • The analysis of primary sources (p. 195)
  • Research in the Public Record Office (the UK's National Archives) and the National Archives, Washington (p. 200)
  • Conclusion: the value and limits of documentary and archival analysis (p. 208)
  • 8 The Internet and Political Research (p. 213)
  • Searching the internet (p. 216)
  • Electronic resources for political research (p. 218)
  • Online polling (p. 224)
  • Elite interviewing online (p. 228)
  • Conclusions (p. 230)
  • 9 Elite Interviewing (p. 231)
  • Decide who you want to see (p. 233)
  • Get access and arrange the interview (p. 235)
  • Conduct the interview (p. 238)
  • Analyse the results (p. 245)
  • Conclusions (p. 246)
  • 10 Discourse Analysis and Other Methods (p. 248)
  • Discourse analysis (p. 249)
  • Content analysis (p. 259)
  • The advantages and limitations of content analysis (p. 264)
  • Participant observation (p. 264)
  • Conclusion (p. 281)
  • 11 Ethics and Political Research (p. 282)
  • The nature of ethical problems (p. 283)
  • Two broad approaches to ethical problems (p. 284)
  • Five basic ethical principles (p. 286)
  • The relationship with sponsors (p. 288)
  • Gatekeepers (p. 292)
  • Citizens (p. 295)
  • The problem of fraud in research (p. 296)
  • Professional codes of conduct (p. 298)
  • Conclusions (p. 303)
  • 12 Research and the Policy Process (p. 305)
  • The demand side: what policymakers want from researchers (p. 305)
  • The supply side: what researchers can provide (p. 310)
  • The mediating effect of national structures and cultures (p. 313)
  • Bridging the gap (p. 318)
  • How could the contribution of research to policymaking be improved? (p. 322)
  • Conclusion (p. 324)
  • 13 Conclusion: Challenging the Mainstream and the Qualitative/Quantitative Divide (p. 325)
  • Feminist methods? (p. 325)
  • Anti-racist and Marxist challenges (p. 330)
  • Theory, methods and the qualitative/quantitative divide (p. 331)
  • Suggestions for Further Reading (p. 335)
  • References (p. 340)
  • Index (p. 361)

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